The Florida DUI Guide

The Florida DUI Guide

I just got arrested for a Florida DUI charge. What happens next? 

ISSUE ONE:  The Implied Consent / Administrative License Suspension (ALS) Proceeding:  Under Florida law, any person who accepts the privilege extended by the laws of this state of operating a motor vehicle within the State  of Florida is, by operating a vehicle, deemed to have given his or her consent  to submit to an approved chemical test or physical test including, but not  limited to, an breath test for the purpose of determining the alcoholic content  of his or her blood or breath if the person is lawfully arrested for any offense  allegedly committed while the person was driving or was in actual physical  control of a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcoholic beverages.

Pursuant to this “implied consent” law, drivers face a penalty (a license  suspension) for failing or refusing a chemical (breath / blood) test.  See  316.1932 Florida Statutes. Your  Florida drivers license (or your right to drive in Florida if you’re not a  Florida  licensed driver) was most likely suspended for six, twelve  or eighteen months for failing (.08 or higher (.02 or higher for  minors; .04 or higher for CDL drivers)) or  refusing a breath test.  Read your paperwork carefully. 

You generally have ten  days from the date of your arrest to request a hearing to  challenge (appeal) the administrative license suspension. 

This  hearing is commonly referred to as a DMV Hearing. If you had a valid Florida driver license at the time of your arrest, the  officer should have issued you a temporary license which is valid for the 10  days following your arrest. If you make a timely request for a hearing to  contest the administrative license suspension, your temporary permit will  generally last until seven days after the administrative hearing. Keep in mind, you face a second separate license suspension if you are convicted of the Florida DUI charge.  See below.

ISSUE TWO:  The  Criminal Charge:  Separate and distinct from the implied consent suspension is the criminal charge  for driving under the influence. Under Florida law, you commit the crime of driving under the influence (DUI) if the you are driving or in  actual physical control of a vehicle and: (a)  You are under the influence of  alcoholic beverages, any chemical substance, or any controlled substance, when  affected to the extent that the person’s normal faculties are impaired; (b)  You have a blood-alcohol level  (BAC) of  0.08 percent or more; or (c)  You have a BAC of  0.08 percent or more grams of alcohol. Subsections (b) and (c) are sometimes referred to as a Per Se DUI offense  or driving with an unlawful blood alcohol level (DUBAL).

Keep in mind that a refusal to submit to a breath, blood, or urine test is  generally admissible as evidence in any Florida DUI criminal case.  A second or  subsequent chemical test refusal is a separate misdemeanor crime. Read your paperwork  carefully, and do not miss  any court appearances or a warrant may be issued for  your arrest. 

Important:  These two issues (the implied consent proceeding and the  Florida DUI criminal charge) are totally separate from one another. 

Will my Florida driver license be revoked / suspended?

RELATED TO ISSUE ONE ABOVE:  Your Florida driver license (or  your right to drive in Florida if you do not have a valid Florida license) may be  suspended for failing―BAC  .08% or greater (.02 or higher for minors (persons under 21 years of age))―a breath or  blood test or for refusing a breath, or blood test.  If you act quickly  (typically within 10 days of your arrest), you can request an appeal of the  proposed administrative license suspension for failing or  refusing the test. 

A hearing will then be scheduled on your appeal  request.  If you win this hearing, the administrative license suspension  will be overturned.  If you lose the hearing (or if you make no appeal),  your suspension of six, twelve, or eighteen months goes into effect. RELATED TO ISSUE TWO ABOVE:  If you are convicted of the DUI  charge you will also lose your license (or  your right to drive in Florida if you don’t have a valid Florida license).  

This suspension typically last from 180 days to two years.  Refer to the  DUI penalty chart below for more information.

I have a commercial driver license (CDL).   What happens to that?

A Florida DUI conviction results in a one year suspension of your commercial  driver license regardless of whether you were driving commercially at the time.   [If you were driving hazardous materials at the time of your DUI arrest a  conviction will result in a three year CDL suspension.  A second DUI  conviction will result in a permanent revocation of your CDL. A first breath test refusal also results in a one year CDL suspension.  A  second refusal (when there’s a prior DUI incident) will result in a lifetime CDL  revocation.

What happens if I get caught driving while my driving privilege (license) is suspended  or revoked?

Driving while your license  is  suspended or revoked for a Florida DUI is a new  criminal offense.  If convicted of  this charge, you face jail time and fines.  Penalties increase if you have  prior DWLS conviction(s).  A third conviction can become a felony under  Florida law.  Also remember that if you’re still on probation for the  Florida DUI  offense while you get a DWLS, you will violate your probation and face additional  jail time for this probation violation (PV).

I really need to drive.  Will I be able to get a  hardship reinstatement / occupational / restricted / probationary permit?

A hardship reinstatement may be available to you if your license is suspended and you had a valid Florida  Driver’s License at the time of your suspension.  There are two types of hardship reinstatement:  Business purpose only  and employment purpose only. 

Business purposes only allows a person to drive to and from work / education; on  the job; to medical appointments; and to your place of worship. 

Employment  purposes only allows driving only to and from work and on the job. Speak to a Florida DUI attorney about whether you qualify and how to apply for  hardship reinstatement. Hardship permits / reinstatement will not allow persons to drive commercially. Put another way, a hardship reinstatement  does not allow persons to drive a commercial motor vehicle.

What is the difference between a DUI, DWI, OWI, OUI,  OMVI, DWUI etc.?

These terms are all acronyms that refer to the crime commonly known  as “drunk driving.”  Different states use different names for the charge. For example, in Wisconsin,  Iowa, and  Michigan the charge is generally known as OWI (operating while intoxicated).  In New York state,  Texas, and in New Jersey,  the charge is known as DWI (driving while intoxicated).  In Oregon,  the term DUII (driving under the influence of an intoxicant) is used.  Florida law refers to “driving under the influence” so DUI is used here.  Most states,  including Georgia and  Alabama use the term DUI as well.

Is a DUI charge in Florida a misdemeanor or felony offense?

In Florida, a DUI charge is always a criminal offense.  Usually a DUI is a misdemeanor crime.   However, a Florida DUI becomes a felony if:

  • the DUI conviction is your third  within the past 10 years; or
  • is your fourth or greater DUI conviction no matter how  old the prior convictions are; or
  • you cause serious bodily  injury to another person while DUI.

What type of penalties might I face if I am convicted of  a Florida DUI charge?

Upon conviction for a Florida DUI a defendant can  receive a variety of penalties including alcohol screening / treatment / education  (DUI school).  A  range of typical penalties for Florida DUI convictions is set forth below.  Note: Unless otherwise noted, the jail time listed is  generally the maximum not the minimum required.

FLORIDA DUI PENALTY CHART See 316.193 F.S.
 CONVICTIONRANGE OF PENALTIES
FIRST DUI BAC less than 0.15% (misdemeanor)
  • probation;
  • fines ranging from $500 – $1000;
  • at least 50 hours community service (may be converted to a fine);
  • up to six months jail;
  • possible vehicle impoundment / immobilization for 10 days;
  • Florida license revocation ranging from 180 days to one year.
FIRST DUI BAC 0.15 % or higher OR child in car (misdemeanor)
  • probation;
  • fines ranging from $1000 – $2000;
  • up to nine months Florida jail time;
  • Florida license revocation of 180 days to one year.
SECOND DUI BAC less than 0.15% (misdemeanor)
  • fines ranging from $1000 – $2000;
  • up to nine months jail;
  • possible vehicle impoundment / immobilization for 30 days if 2nd conviction within five years;
  • Florida license revocation of 180 days to one year; however, if 2nd conviction within five years, then five year revocation (at least one year wait for hardship).
SECOND DUI BAC 0.15 % or higher OR child in car (misdemeanor)
  • fines ranging from $2000 – $4000;
  • up to 12 months jail (if 2nd conviction within last five years, minimum 10 days jail);
  • Florida license revocation of 180 days to one year; however, if 2nd conviction within five years, then five year revocation (at least one year wait for hardship license).
THIRD DUI (misdemeanor)
  • fines ranging from $2000 – $5000;
  • up to 12 months jail time;
  • possible vehicle impoundment (length varies depending on age of prior convictions);
  • license revocation of 180 days to one year; however, if one of the two prior conviction is within five years, then five year Florida license revocation (at least one year wait for hardship license).
THIRD DUI (third conviction within 10 years) (felony)
  • up to $5000 fine;
  • up to five years prison (if 3rd conviction within the last 10 years, minimum 30 days jail);
  • possible vehicle impoundment / immobilization for 90 days if 3rd  conviction within 10 years;
  • ten year Florida license revocation (at least two year wait for hardship license).
FOURTH OR GREATER DUI (felony)
  • fine of at least $2000;
  • up to five years prison time;
  • permanent Florida license revocation with no hardship license possible.

Will I be able to plea bargain / negotiate my Florida DUI charge  down to a lesser type offense?

Possibly.  Plea bargaining is an area that any experienced Florida DUI attorney would discuss with the  prosecutor on the client’s behalf.  However, Florida courts are prohibited from withholding adjudication in DUI cases or from  reducing a DUI charge if the your blood alcohol content (BAC) is 0.15 percent or  greater.

Will a Florida DUI conviction go on “my record?”

Yes.  A DUI conviction will go on your Florida driving record.   A Florida DUI will stay on your driving record essentially forever.

Just how much jail / prison time will I have to do if I am convicted of a  DUI offense in the State of Florida?

The amount of  incarceration (jail or prison) received from a Florida DUI conviction will depend on a number of factors,  including (but not limited to) the following:

  • your prior  driving record especially your DUI / DWI history (in Florida or elsewhere);
  • your level of  intoxication / BAC (breath / blood alcohol content especially 0.15 % or  greater);
  • whether there  was an crash / accident involved; •  whether there  was bodily injury to another person in the collision;
  • which Florida  county or city / municipal court your case is in;
  • what judge you  are sentenced by;
  • whether there  was a passenger especially a child passenger in your car.

I was involved in a collision along with my DUI.  What do I need to  know?

Avoiding a Leaving the Scene of an Accident (Hit and Run) Charge. 

Whenever an operator is involved in an accident in Florida, several obligations  arise. Under Florida law, the driver of any vehicle involved  in a crash resulting in injury to or death of any person or damage to any  vehicle or other property which is driven or attended by any person shall  provide the driver’s name, address, and the registration number of the vehicle he or she  is driving.  Further the driver must upon request and if available exhibit  the driver’s license  or permit to drive, to any person injured in such crash or to the driver or  occupant of or person attending any vehicle or other property damaged in the  crash.

The driver must also assist any injured persons in physician, surgeon, or hospital for medical or  surgical treatment if it is apparent that treatment is necessary, or if such  carrying is requested by the injured person.  See Florida Statute  316.061. Failure to comply with the above when a person is injured or killed is a felony  crime and can result in prison time and a license revocation.  See Florida  Statutes 316.027.  Leaving the scene of an accident involving death or  injury while also committing a DUI can result in a minimum two year prison  sentence.  Id.

Failure to comply when only property is damaged is a misdemeanor crime. Requirement to Notify / Complete a Traffic Crash (Accident) Report.  The driver of a vehicle in the State of Florida involved in a crash  resulting in injury or death of any persons or damage to any vehicle or other  property in an amount of $500 or more must immediately give notice of the crash  to the local law enforcement department; however, if the crash involves damage  less than $500, no injuries, the vehicles did not need a wrecker, and the crash  did not involve an intoxicated or “hit and run” driver, the driver may download  and complete a report for insurance purposes.

Will I be placed on probation if I’m convicted of a Florida DUI charge?

Yes.  If you’re convicted of a DUI in Florida you will be placed on  probation for a period of time and ordered to comply with a number of conditions  including obtaining an alcohol / drug screening and completing treatment.   Typically, probation conditions will include the following:

  • Report to the probation department as directed.
  • Permit such probation officers to visit your home or elsewhere.
  • Find and maintain suitable employment if able.
  • Remain within a specified place.
  • Pay any fines, fees and other court ordered obligations including restitution.
  • Support your dependents to the best of your ability.
  • Not associate with persons engaged in criminal activities.
  • Submit to random body substance testing as directed by the probation officer or the staff of the treatment center you’re receiving treatment.
  • Don’t possess, carry, or own any firearm.
  • Don’t use intoxicants or possess any controlled substances unless prescribed by a licensed physician.
  • Don’t knowingly visit places where intoxicants, drugs, or other dangerous substances are unlawfully sold, dispensed, or used.
  • Submit to a DNA blood draw when ordered.

I  am licensed to drive in a state other than Florida and I was cited for a DUI in  Florida.  Will my driver license be suspended?

Florida only has the authority to suspend your right to drive in the State of Florida.   However, Florida and 44 other states and the District of Columbia  have adopted an agreement known as the “Driver License Compact.”   Florida  will report a Florida DUI conviction to the home state of the  driver (assuming the home state has also adopted the Compact).  Your own  state will then generally take action to suspend your license. This also works in reverse.  If you are a Florida licensed driver and you are convicted of a DUI charge in  another state, Florida will likely suspend your license if it learns of the  out of state DUI conviction. The state where you received the DUI charge  will generally notify Florida once you’re convicted.

Will I have to install an Ignition  Interlock Device on my car?

An ignition interlock device (IID) is a breath alcohol  measurement device that is connected to a motor vehicle ignition.  In order  to start the motor vehicle, a driver must blow a breath sample into the device  which then measures alcohol concentration.  If the alcohol concentration  exceeds 0.05 percent on the interlock device, the vehicle will  not start.  The table below shows generally when an ignition interlock  device may be required in a vehicle under the Florida DUI ignition interlock  program.  There are costs associated with installation and monthly monitoring of  the IID.  

FLORIDA DUI CONVICTIONIID REQUIREMENT
1st Florida DUInot required; court discretion
1st Florida DUI and BAC is 0.15 % or above or child in carat least six months
2nd Florida DUIat least one year
2nd Florida DUI and BAC is 0.15 % or above or child in carat least two years
3rd Florida DUIat least two years

What will a DUI charge do to my insurability?

If your insurance  company finds out about a Florida DUI one of two things are likely to  happen.  Either your Florida insurer will raise your rates or your  insurance may be  cancelled or non-renewed.  Your insurance company will learn about your DUI  if you have to file an FR-44.

What is an FR-44 / Financial Responsibility Insurance?

An FR-44 is a  form from an Florida licensed insurance company certifying  that you have purchased liability insurance that meets the required  coverage amounts.  The FR-44 provides proof to the  Florida FLHSMV that you are  insured.  If you cancel your insurance or the insurance company cancels  your policy before your suspension period is over, the company must notify the  State of Florida  that the insurance is canceled. If you’re convicted of a Florida DUI charge you will be required to file and  maintain an FR-44. FR-44 financial  responsibility certification replaces the old SR-22 requirement for Florida DUI  convictions.  [Most other states require an SR-22 filing.]  FR-44 liability insurance  coverage limits are double the old SR-22 insurance coverage limits.

Are  there any concerns for licensed pilots who get a DUI offense in the State of Florida?

Yes.  The Federal  Aviation Administration (FAA) has  special required reporting requirements for Florida DUI convictions and administrative  (implied consent) license suspensions.   Learn more here.

Are there any concerns for mariners licensed by the United States Coast Guard  who get a DUI?

Yes.  An applicant for a Coast Guard credential must disclose all criminal convictions  (including Florida DUI convictions)  on their application form.  In addition, the Regional Exam Center (REC) performs  a National Driver Register check on applicants.  Once a DUI conviction is  identified, the REC evaluates the applicant’s conviction and associated  facts.

I missed my court date.  What should I do now?

Failing to appear (FTA) for a Florida court appearance is to be avoided.  When you miss a court  hearing, bad things follow.  At a minimum, the Florida court typically  issues a warrant for your arrest (commonly known as a bench warrant).  Talk to an  attorney as soon as possible.  Sometimes, your only option is to turn  yourself in on the outstanding warrant.  A new court date will then be  scheduled.

What happens if I was on probation  when I got arrested for my Florida DUI?

Committing a new offense while you’re on probation for a  previous offense creates two problems.  First, you face the new Florida DUI  charge.  Second, you face a probation violation hearing for failing to obey  all laws (a standard condition of probation).  The most serious scenario is  when you receive a new Florida DUI offense when you’re already on probation for  a previous DUI offense.  When this happens, its in your best interest to  speak to a Florida DUI lawyer as soon as possible. I’m not a United States citizen.  Will a DUI  conviction result in my removal from this country? Probably not. 

Typical, Florida DUI offenses (no priors; no injuries) are  not considered crimes of moral turpitude or aggravated felonies resulting in  removal.  It is important to consult an experienced immigration lawyer  about your situation just as you should consult with an experienced Florida  criminal defense lawyer about your pending DUI offense. Keep two points in mind.  First, it is very important to answer honestly  all questions about prior arrests / convictions on immigration and Visa  applications and forms.  Lying on these forms is often considered more  serious than any DUI conviction.  Second, non-citizens should take extra  care not to drive on a suspended or revoked drivers license.

Can I represent myself in court on my Florida DUI and / or other  criminal offense(s)?

Yes.  You  have an absolute right to represent yourself on any Florida criminal charge no matter  how serious the offense is including a Florida DUI offense.  Keep in mind that  DUI defense is a complicated  area of the law as shown by the information above.  If you cannot afford to  hire your own counsel, you definitely should apply for court appointed counsel  to represent you.  You have no right to court appointed counsel at the  implied consent license hearing.

SHORT ANSWERS TO RANDOM FLORIDA DUI QUESTIONS

Q.  Can I get a Florida driver license if I had a DUI 20 years ago?

A.  If your license is no longer suspended or revoked for any reason in any state, you may get a new license.  It is highly unlikely that you’re still suspended from a 20 year old DUI.  Contact the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles to learn whether you’re eligible for reinstatement or a new license.

Q.  I got a DWI in North Carolina, and I am moving to Florida.  Will I be able to get a hardship license in Florida?

A.  No.  In order to be eligible for a hardship reinstatement, you must first have had a valid Florida driver license.

Q.  What happens if you violate your probation for a Florida DUI charge?

A.  You will likely have a probation violation hearing before the court.  The court may do anything from continuing your probation with a small sanction to revoking your probation and sentencing you to a lengthy jail sentence.  Your sanction (sentence) will depend on your history and the severity of your violation(s).

Q.  Will Georgia find out about my Florida DUI? A.  If you’re licensed in Georgia and you’re convicted of the DUI charge in Florida, Georgia will almost certainly find out about the conviction though it may take several weeks.

 

Florida Statutes Section 316.193 sets forth the crime of driving under the influence as well as penalties.  The statute is paraphrased below. 

Always consult a lawyer for legal advice about how the law applies to your situation.  

HOW THE CRIME OF DUI IS COMMITTED (1)  You are guilty of the offense of DUI and are subject to punishment as provided in subsection (2) if you are driving or in actual physical control of a vehicle within the State of Florida and: (a)  You are under the influence of alcoholic beverages, an inhalant, or any controlled substance, when affected to the extent that your normal faculties are impaired; (b)  You have a blood-alcohol level of 0.08 % or more; or (c)  You have a breath-alcohol level of 0.08 % or more.

FINES; JAIL TIME; IGNITION INTERLOCK DEVICE (2)(a)  Except as provided below any person who is convicted of a Florida DUI shall be punished: 1.  By a fine of: a.  Between $250 and $500 for a first conviction. b.  Between $500 and $1,000 for a second conviction; and 2.  By jail time for: a.  Up to six months for a first conviction. b.  Up to nine months for a second conviction. 3.  For a second conviction, by mandatory placement for a period of at least 1 year, at your sole expense, of an ignition interlock device upon all vehicles that are leased or owned and operated by you when you qualify for a permanent or restricted license. (b)1.  Anyone who is convicted of a third DUI for an offense that occurs within 10 years after a prior DUI conviction commits a felony of the third degree.  In addition, the court shall order the mandatory placement for a period of not less than two years, at your sole expense, of an ignition interlock device upon all vehicles that are leased or owned and operated by you when you qualify for a permanent or restricted license. 2.  Anyone who is convicted of a third DUI for an offense that occurs more than 10 years after the date of a prior DUI conviction shall be punished by a fine of betwen $1,000 and $2,500 and by imprisonment for up to 12 months. In addition, the court shall order the mandatory placement for a period of at least 2 years, at your sole expense, of an ignition interlock device upon all vehicles that are leased or owned and operated by you when you qualify for a permanent or restricted license. 3.  Anyone who is convicted of a fourth or subsequent Florida DUI, regardless of when any prior conviction for a violation of this section occurred, commits a felony of the third degree.  However, the fine imposed for a fourth or subsequent DUI must be at least $1,000.

DUI WITH ACCIDENT INVOLVING PROPERTY DAMAGE OR INJURY OR DEATH (3)  Anyone: (a)  Who commits a DUI; and (c)  Who, while operating a vehicle under the influence, causes or contributes to causing: 1.  Damage to the property or person of another commits a misdemeanor of the first degree. 2.  Serious bodily injury to another commits a felony of the third degree. 3.  The death of any human being or unborn quick child commits DUI manslaughter, and commits: a.  A felony of the second degree. b.  A felony of the first degree, if: (I)  At the time of the crash, the person knew, or should have known, that the crash occurred; and (II)  You failed to give information and render aid as required by Florida law. Anyone who is convicted of DUI manslaughter shall be sentenced to a mandatory minimum term of 4 years prison.

DUI PENALTIES WITH A HIGH BAC OR CHILD IN CAR (4)  Anyone who is convicted of a Florida DUI and who has a BAC of 0.20 % or higher, or anyone who is convicted of a violation of a DUI and who at the time of the offense was accompanied in the vehicle by a child under the age of 18 years, shall be punished: (a)  By a fine of: 1.  Between $500 and $1,000 for a first conviction. 2.  Between $1,000 and $2,000 for a second conviction. 3.  At least $2,000 for a third or subsequent conviction. (b)  By jail time for: 1.  Up to 9 months for a first conviction. 2.  Up to 12 months for a second conviction. (c)  In addition to the penalties above, the court shall order the mandatory placement of an ignition interlock device upon all vehicles that are  leased or owned and routinely operated by you for up to 6 months for the first offense and for at least two years for a second offense, when you qualify for a permanent or restricted license. PROBATION AND

TREATMENT REQUIRED (5)  The court shall place all persons convicted of a DUI on monthly reporting probation and shall require completion of a substance abuse course conducted by a DUI program.

ADDITIONAL MINIMUM PENALTIES:  JAIL TIME; COMMUNITY SERVICE; AND VEHICLE IMPOUNDMENT (6)  With respect to any person convicted of a violation of subsection (1), regardless of any penalty imposed pursuant to subsection (2), subsection (3), or subsection (4): (a)  For the first conviction, the court shall place the defendant on probation for a period not to exceed one year and, as a condition of such probation, shall order the defendant to participate in public service or a community work project for a minimum of 50 hours; or the court may order instead, that any defendant pay an additional fine of $10 for each hour of public service or community work otherwise required, if, after consideration of the residence or location of the defendant at the time public service or community work is required, payment of the fine is in the best interests of the state. However, the total period of probation and incarceration may not exceed 1 year. The court must also, as a condition of probation, order the impoundment or immobilization of the vehicle that was operated by or in the actual control of the defendant or any one vehicle registered in the defendant’s name at the time of impoundment or immobilization, for a period of 10 days or for the unexpired term of any lease or rental agreement that expires within 10 days. The impoundment or immobilization must not occur concurrently with the incarceration of the defendant. The impoundment or immobilization order may be dismissed in accordance with paragraph (e), paragraph (f), paragraph (g), or paragraph (h). (b)  For the second conviction for an offense that occurs within a period of 5 years after the date of a prior conviction for violation of this section, the court shall order imprisonment for not less than 10 days. The court must also, as a condition of probation, order the impoundment or immobilization of all vehicles owned by the defendant at the time of impoundment or immobilization, for a period of 30 days or for the unexpired term of any lease or rental agreement that expires within 30 days. The impoundment or immobilization must not occur concurrently with the incarceration of the defendant and must occur concurrently with the driver’s license revocation imposed. The impoundment or immobilization order may be dismissed in accordance with paragraph (e), paragraph (f), paragraph (g), or paragraph (h). At least 48 hours of confinement must be consecutive. (c)  For the third or subsequent conviction for an offense that occurs within a period of 10 years after the date of a prior conviction for violation of this section, the court shall order imprisonment for not less than 30 days. The court must also, as a condition of probation, order the impoundment or immobilization of all vehicles owned by the defendant at the time of impoundment or immobilization, for a period of 90 days or for the unexpired term of any lease or rental agreement that expires within 90 days. The impoundment or immobilization must not occur concurrently with the incarceration of the defendant and must occur concurrently with the driver’s license revocation. The impoundment or immobilization order may be dismissed in accordance with paragraph (e), paragraph (f), paragraph (g), or paragraph (h). At least 48 hours of confinement must be consecutive. (d)  The court must at the time of sentencing the defendant issue an order for the impoundment or immobilization of a vehicle. Within 7 business days after the date that the court issues the order of impoundment or immobilization, the clerk of the court must send notice by certified mail, return receipt requested, to the registered owner of each vehicle, if the registered owner is a person other than the defendant, and to each person of record claiming a lien against the vehicle.

EXCEPTIONS TO IMPOUNDMENT / IMMOBILIZATION (g)  The court shall dismiss the order of impoundment or immobilization of the vehicle if the court finds that the family of the owner of the vehicle has no other private or public means of transportation. (h)  The court may also dismiss the order of impoundment or immobilization of any vehicles that are owned by the defendant but that are operated solely by the employees of the defendant or any business owned by the defendant. (k)  In the court’s discretion, you may be required to serve all or any portion of a term of imprisonment to which the defendant has been sentenced pursuant to this section in a residential alcoholism treatment program or a residential drug abuse treatment program. Any time spent in such a program must be credited by the court toward the term of imprisonment.

DELAY IN RELEASE FROM CUSTODY IMMEDIATELY AFTER A DUI ARREST (9)  If you’re arrested for a Florida DUI, you may not be released from custody: (a)  Until you are no longer under the influence and affected to the extent that his or her normal faculties are impaired; (b)  Until your blood-alcohol level or breath-alcohol level is less than 0.05 percent; or (c)  Until 8 hours have elapsed from the time the you were arrested.                      

 (original post at: http://www.floridadui.pro)

 
Select Insurance Group